Vegetable Gardening Starting with “S”

No, I haven’t gone bonkers, there are some very simple rules to having your own successful vegetable garden – and each one of them begins with the letter “S” so they are incredibly easy to remember.

S is for – Selection

When you are deciding what to grow in your vegetable garden there is one very important thing to remember – grow the things which you enjoy eating. Some vegetables are easier to grow than others – beans, tomatoes, squash and lettuce are notoriously easy but don’t forget that the whole point of growing vegetables in your garden is to eat and enjoy them, so grow them which you will eat and enjoy.

S is for – Site

Out of sight is out of mind so put your veggies close to where you can see them every day. You also need to remember that vegetables need lots of water and locating them close to a water source will make your life easier and encourage you to water your vegetable plot regularly.

S is for – Size

Don’t be tempted to try to do too much when you start your first vegetable garden – start small and let it grow. You are far more likely to continue growing your own vegetables if your first year is a success than if you give yourself too much work and ultimately fail. It is also worth remembering that your family can only eat so much of one thing and there really is no point in growing thousands of tomatoes if you won’t be able to eat them. The neighbors might do alright out of your project and it’s nice to be neighborly but you do get where I’m coming from right?

S is for – Soil

Vegetables do like well drained soil which is fertile and has plenty of compost added each year. If you take the trouble to build up raised vegetable beds this really helps with potential drainage problems and helps the soil to warm up a little bit quicker in the springtime. A raised vegetable bed can help to reduce back problems too – plus you won’t keep trampling on the soil and compressing it causing further drainage problems.

S is for – Sun

There’s no substitute for sunshine – most veggies love it and need at least a good six hours each day in order to grow to their full potential. Less sunny gardens should stick to things like leafy greens like lettuce, Swiss chard and varieties of cabbage which don’t need quite so much sunshine. Another idea for the less than sunny garden is to grow a variety of root crops such as beets, carrots and radishes. If the sunshine is really a problem maybe you should think about planting your veggies in pots and containers so you can move them around into the sun when needed.

Growing your own vegetables is really enjoyable and worthwhile – there’s nothing quite like the experience of harvesting your own vegetables and making a deliciously fresh, crisp green salad or some wonderfully tasty onions. Home grown vegetables really do taste so much better.